2013 Pizza Poll: What’s your favorite in Rahway?

It’s time to take a break from all the serious, newsy blog posts and get back to having some fun. Feel free to use the comments section to make your case for your favorite pizza place.

Continue reading 2013 Pizza Poll: What’s your favorite in Rahway?

7-11, new space coming to St. Georges plaza

The Deals shopping center on St. Georges Avenue will be getting a 7-Eleven as well as two tenants in a new addition to the property later this year.

Continue reading 7-11, new space coming to St. Georges plaza

Senior housing facility to open this summer

Fifteen months after breaking ground and five and half years after it was first presented, a senior housing facility will welcome residents later this summer on the site of the former St. Mary’s Church convent.

Continue reading Senior housing facility to open this summer

Demolition under way on A&M Supply building

(Photo By Derron Palmer)

Demolition is under way on the A&M Supply building on Campbell Street. The industrial building along with a neighboring residential property at the corner of Elm Avenue will come down to eventually make way for Metro Rahway, a five-story, 116-unit rental project.

Continue reading Demolition under way on A&M Supply building

City commits to 10% cut in impervious surfaces

The City Council last month passed a resolution to “commit to a goal of 10 percent reduction in impervious surfaces” at municipally-owned facilities by 2015.

The city “will make best efforts to reduce impervious surfaces, including equivalent storm water runoff reductions, to set an example to communities that storm water management is a serious matter,” the resolution stated.

The resolution cites communities in the Rahway River Watershed as suffering in excess of $50 million in damages to households and businesses from Hurricane Irene in 2011. “The overdevelopment of properties and the elimination of pervious surfaces throughout the watershed have compromised the ability of the region to manage its storm water without such major damages as seen during Irene.”

This piece in Atlantic Cities, “The Way We Build Cities Is Making Them Flood,” essentially blames the urban impervious surfaces (parking lots, anywhere that water can’t drain, like asphalt), for flooding in the Chicago area — only not where you’d think.